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Welders And Welding

Discussion in 'The Tool Shed' started by IRQVET, Mar 9, 2015.

  1. Aug 26, 2015
    uncamonkey

    uncamonkey Member

    Greeley CO
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    Pretty much you are right. It can be done with a flux core machine but there is much more grinding and cleaning that will be needed. Don't use an Oxy acetalene torch, too much heat and then you get to learn about more body work to fix the warped parts.
     
  2. Aug 26, 2015
    Warloch

    Warloch Did you say Flattie??? Staff Member

    Falcon, CO
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    You have no idea how much easier that is... the time alone is worth it.
     
  3. Aug 26, 2015
    uncamonkey

    uncamonkey Member

    Greeley CO
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    A friend borrowed my 220V welder to build his spare tire/gas can carrier. He liked it a lot so he went out to Cardboard Fright and got a 110V flux core machine. He's not too happy with it. The thing will at least stick a couple pieces of steel together but you spend about the same amount of time cleaning up the splatter. He used to weld for a living, he should have known better.
     
  4. Aug 26, 2015
    Johns1967CJ5

    Johns1967CJ5 Sponsor

    Northern NJ
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    I feel his pain
     
  5. Aug 26, 2015
    uncamonkey

    uncamonkey Member

    Greeley CO
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    The guy is pretty darn good with a stick welder. I suppose after several years under manure spreaders you learn how to get the job done quickly. I would never go back to a flux core If I could avoid it. They are just not up to the level of a shield gas unit.
    Besides, it gives you a chance to buy a new tool.
     
  6. Aug 26, 2015
    47v6

    47v6 junk wrecker! 2023 Sponsor 2022 Sponsor

    USA
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    I started to weld my junk body back together 8 or 9 years ago with an ac/dc lincoln arc welder. That was not at all fun. I bought a lincoln HD 175 mig and used flux core in it. It was ok, then I bought the bottle to go with it. never looked back. I ended up buying a much larger older unit, airco dip pak 220 or something. It has a 60% duty cycle at 200 amps plus a stitch setting that i never have used. Works pretty good for me. Anyway, get the MIG setup. Its worth it. Don't do harbor fright though. lincoln will do ok, miller will do better and the new miller machines auto detect voltage, so you can run 110 or 220
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2015
  7. Aug 27, 2015
    uncamonkey

    uncamonkey Member

    Greeley CO
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    OK, you get the idea. A friend does power plants and oil refinery QA inspections. Really he is just a welding inspector that learned a bit more. At the end of a job they sell off all of the equipment for about half of the cost. If only I have the $ to buy one. Shipping a welder to here from Australia just doesn't make much sense.
     
  8. Aug 27, 2015
    SFaulken

    SFaulken Active Member

    Bellevue, WA
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    I'll give another ++ for running a shield gas, instead of flux core, if your machine has the gas option. I run flux core out on the trail with my portable, just because it cuts down on things to keep track of, but in the shop? Not on your life.

    That being said, I've got a little Blue Point branded 110VAC MIG welder I run on gas, and an *ancient* old lincoln AC buzz box I do thicker stuff with. For patching holes, I actually usually do that with my oxy-acetylene rig and a welding rod, but I'm gonna see about finding a big chunk of copper like was suggested earlier to use as a backer and try it with the MIG....
     
  9. Oct 4, 2015
    IRQVET

    IRQVET Bubbaification Exorcist

    Tallahassee, FL.
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    I went to my cousins yesterday to finish up a little welding after my flux core ran out of wire (I'm cheap). My cousin has a Hobart 210 MVP and this was the first time I've welded without my little 120V buzz box. Needless to say, my welder popped up on CL today. The difference was unbelievable. As it turns out I actually can lay down a nice bead.
     
  10. Oct 4, 2015
    uncamonkey

    uncamonkey Member

    Greeley CO
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    Yeah, a big advantage to running gas MIGs welders. I could never run a flux core again, by choice. A friend borrowed my 220 volt Clarke welder to build a tire rack for his jeep. He liked it and headed over to Cardbord Freight and got a 110V fluxcore welder. Nope, not the same. Bob knows how to weld with a stick very well.
     
  11. Oct 5, 2015
    nickmil

    nickmil In mothballs.

    Happy Valley, OR
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    For sheet metal .023" wire and gas is the only way to go. I will NOT give up my gas shielded mig wire. I do however have a roll of flux core that collects dust until I need it (occasionally) for work outside where it's windy etc.

    I have both a 110v Lincoln SP-125 that I picked up at a garage sale for $100 and an old Millermatic 185 220v. machine that works very well. Paid $250 for it used. Deals are out there on quality equipment if you are patient and persistent.
     
  12. Oct 6, 2015
    IRQVET

    IRQVET Bubbaification Exorcist

    Tallahassee, FL.
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    That's how I found my CJ after all, lol.
     
  13. Oct 6, 2015
    uncamonkey

    uncamonkey Member

    Greeley CO
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    Welding is easy until you set yourself on fire or burn the crap out your hand or feet.
     
  14. Oct 6, 2015
    Fly Navy

    Fly Navy Member

    Emerson, IA
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    Are you kidding... that is when the fun starts! It's not welding unless you've got sparks going down the back of your neck or burning holes in your new shoes:)
     
  15. Oct 6, 2015
    47v6

    47v6 junk wrecker! 2023 Sponsor 2022 Sponsor

    USA
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    All my shirts have the right bottom corner burnt off from cut off wheels on angle grinders.
    I have a pair of bonded leather boots that I actually lit on fire last week. I laughed and laughed. Wearing them right now, steel toe showing through on both, ones just a bit burnt!
     
  16. Oct 6, 2015
    uncamonkey

    uncamonkey Member

    Greeley CO
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    When I first learnd some welding back in the "60s, the thing was to have the bottom seam cut off of your Jeans and have the proper amount of fraying there. Nice fire hazzard. I had to tell a few other students that their pants were on fire. Well, It happened to me too.
    I made a leather apron soon after starting overhead welding. Another welder friend said that having your clothes heavily starched will prevent burning holes in them.
    My favorite sneakers have some interesting holes in them. (I barely fit 12eeee's). Lots of socks, pants and tshirts show damage.
    If you are welding in new floor pans, don't put your hand down where you just finished welding.:)
     
  17. Oct 9, 2015
    IRQVET

    IRQVET Bubbaification Exorcist

    Tallahassee, FL.
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    I did some checking but I didn't find anything definitive. Does anyone have a list of welder manufacturers that produce welders made here in the US?

    I know Miller and Hobart, but are there any others?
     
  18. Oct 9, 2015
    Fly Navy

    Fly Navy Member

    Emerson, IA
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    I am pretty sure Lincoln welders are U.S. made... or at least used to be.
     
  19. Oct 9, 2015
    tarry99

    tarry99 Member

    Northern California
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    Don't know about any others , but I will speak on behalf of Miller. Still have my original Miller Dialarc 250 HF Tig machine I bought new 35 years ago, My Miller 250 Bobcat that rides around in the back of the service truck w/over 3000 hrs is still going strong..........purchased this Miller 211 Mig last year ( which by the way will run on either 110 or 220 ), my second wire machine...........Point is if your going to be around this stuff the rest of your life buy some quality. The offshore stuff may be cheap, but you'll be unhappy with it's performance and replace it several times over a lifetime. Just my Opinion.

    [​IMG]
     
  20. Oct 9, 2015
    ITLKSEZ

    ITLKSEZ Hope for the best, prepare for the worst

    Spokane Valley, WA
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    I bought a 250 amp Thermal Arc 210 (by Thermodyne, same company that makes Victor torches and Tweco MIG guns... and I see now they've merged with ESAB) about 6 years ago and could not be more pleased. I've used a lot of different machines of varying sizes and capabilities, and this one is right up there with the best I've ever used (aside from massive 600 amp units for structural welding...). Its range, stability, consistency and build quality is amazing. :)

    This thread just made me go down to the shop and see if its country of origin was printed on it anywhere. Made in Malaysia. mehh
     
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