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Rocker Arms For The Dauntless V6 - New Ones To Be Had!

Discussion in 'Early CJ5 and CJ6 Tech' started by John Gedde, Aug 5, 2020.

  1. Aug 5, 2020
    John Gedde

    John Gedde Been around the block once or twice...

    Middle Island, NY
    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2019
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    Just sharing info:
    I've found that rocker arms from a Land Rover V8 are an exact fit for the Dauntless V6 engine. After all they both share the same Buick roots.

    The part numbers are 602153 and 602154 for the left and right rockers. You can get cheapos for about 11 bucks each, but I've already had one break, so I'd recommend genuine Land Rover parts (which are about $40 each).

    Rocker shafts from a Rover V8 can also be used on the Dauntless, but they need to be cut down to length and, if I remember correctly, re-counterbored for the end plug. Easy work if you have a lathe. That's what I did. The replacements are nowhere near as hard as the stock ones.

    Cheers,
    John
     
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  2. Aug 5, 2020
    colojeepguy

    colojeepguy Colorado Springs 2019 Sponsor

    At the foot of...
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    Good info!
     
  3. Aug 5, 2020
    Jeepenstein

    Jeepenstein Me like Jeep..

    Central FL
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    Wow, nice find!!!
     
  4. Aug 5, 2020
    Mcruff

    Mcruff Earlycj5 Machinist

    Albertville, AL
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    Hardness could be changed by having them titanium nitrided. Wouldn’t cost to much.
     
  5. Aug 5, 2020
    Keys5a

    Keys5a Sponsor

    Florida Keys
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    I've posted up this interchange mulitiple times. I believe the last Land Rover to use the Buick-derived engine was either 2003 or 2004 Discovery.
    -Donny
     
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  6. Aug 5, 2020
    Cap-n-Cray

    Cap-n-Cray I want to do this again.. Staff Member

    Bainbridge...
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    My '95 Discovery has a Buick 3.9 V8...
     
  7. Aug 6, 2020
    Keys5a

    Keys5a Sponsor

    Florida Keys
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    My '80 Triumph TR8 has the 3.5 L (215 cu in) original displacement. I have a 4.2 L version for another sports car.
    -Donny
     
  8. Aug 6, 2020
    rejeep

    rejeep Well-Known Member 2020 Sponsor 2019 Sponsor

    Rochester, NY
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    The Rover V8 is exactly a dauntless minus 2 cyl.

    Rover was suppose to acquire the V6 back when the bought the aluminum V8 but didn’t have the funding. if Rover would have gotten their hands on this and it made its way into the Series trucks we could have had a different history of Land Rover North America...
     
  9. Aug 6, 2020
    Steve's 70-5

    Steve's 70-5 Active Member 2020 Sponsor

    Louisville, Ky
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    I talked to a company in California and got rockers and push rods from them that had the oil passage in the push rod.

    Look up. Rocker Arms Unlimited
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2020
  10. Aug 7, 2020
    Keys5a

    Keys5a Sponsor

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    Not exactly, but a reletive. The 215 Buick and all the Rover engines share a unique bellhousing bolt pattern, as does the Buick 198. The 225 has the BOP GM bellhousing pattern, and the lifter galley is sealed with the intake manifold, where the 215/Rover uses a valley pan to seal the lifter galley. The two engines do share to same timing cover and oil pump (but with different filter housing directions), and the rocker gear. The internal rotating mass is not the same between them either (bore, stroke, rod length, etc). The '64 Buick 300 heads (and rocker gear) and crank can be used on the 215, though the 300 had an iron block and the BOP bellhousing pattern.
    -Donny
     
  11. Aug 7, 2020
    rejeep

    rejeep Well-Known Member 2020 Sponsor 2019 Sponsor

    Rochester, NY
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    So is the 198 a 215 minus 2?

    I saw the 2 side by side in a far off land a long time ago and I couldn’t tell the difference
     
  12. Aug 7, 2020
    Keys5a

    Keys5a Sponsor

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    As far as the history of Land Rover and the GM acquired engines, Rover had all they needed with the 215/3.5, but didn't make use of it until the early '70s for Land Rover's Forward Control, about 5 years after they acquired it. Around 1979, they finally created a Series known as a Series Stage 1 that got the 3.5 alloy V8, and this continued to about 1984, but was never officially imported to the US. This was the interum model that bridged from the Series 3 to the Defenders, by borrowing/sustituting the Forward Control's V8 for the anemic 2.25 4 cyl. or rare 2.6. This V8 model had no effect on the North American market except to be a stepping stone for the Defender, which eventually came 10 years later to North America in 1994.
    The first application of the alloy V8 in England was the Morgan +8 and the Rover 3500, both in 1968, a year after acquiring the right to the engine. Neither of these cars made a significant opening in the North American market either.
    -Donny
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2020
  13. Aug 7, 2020
    Keys5a

    Keys5a Sponsor

    Florida Keys
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    Not quite either. The 198 has a bore of 3.625"vs the 215 bore is 3.5", and the 198 stroke is 3.1875" vs the 215 is 2.8". I had to look up the 198 specs, but I knew they weren't the same. The obvious difference is the iron block vs the alloy block.
    -Donny
     

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