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"D" Ring education....

Discussion in 'Builds and Fabricators Forum' started by Old Bill, Dec 28, 2004.

  1. Dec 30, 2004
    termin8ed

    termin8ed I didn't do it Staff Member Sponsor

    Mason, MI
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    Dec 22, 2002
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    2,598
    Tim
    I used a hole saw to drill a 7/8" hole in a piece of steel before. Just get one thats ment to drill metal and wood. Turn the speed waaay down and go at it. Oil or cutting fluid to. I'd use a drill press and vice to do it though.

    Got my hole saw at Home depot.
    Lot cheaper than a 1" twist drill. even if you toast it after a couple holes. I've got a 5/8, 3/4 and 7/8 that I've used them on up to 1/4" steel
     
  2. Dec 30, 2004
    Old Bill

    Old Bill Aggressively passive....

    Really Southern...
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    My hole saws weren't what I'd consider "cheap", but then I've been known to buy the better stuff, so I'm not afraid to spend a bit more.

    Anyway, here's a 1" drill bit that is probably comparable in price to a hole saw and arbor.

    http://www.jlindustrial.com/catalog/product.jsp?origin=SEARCH:JL_PART&id=RSA-10064L

    Still need a heavy drill press at low speed though, and lots of cutting oil.
     
  3. Dec 30, 2004
    nickmil

    nickmil In mothballs. Sponsor

    Happy Valley, OR
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    IIRC they are 3" tall and 4" wide. Bolt pattern is 2" tall and 3" wide. I have them for a tow bar and also work well for pulling/winching. Nickmil
     
  4. Dec 30, 2004
    Mcruff

    Mcruff Earlycj5 Machinist Sponsor

    Albertville, AL
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    You guys need to start slummin with the some of the machinist guys.:D Heck I have made so much crap for friends and stuff it is pitiful. Usually charge a beer or chicken lunch or somethin like that or a few $$. Take a night class at the local tech school just to learn a little and get access to the machines. Heck go by you a $900 mill drill and go to town, you'll use that as much or more than your welder once you get them. You can then charge your buddies a few dollars to do their machine work and recoup your money. Thats what I did. My used milling machine will be here in about 8 days!! Thanks to all the guys for the last 2-2 1/2 years on this board and others that I have machined parts for I saved enough along with my buying Jeep parts to finally buy a decent used mill.;) But anybody interested in doing this give me holl'r and I will answer any question I can!!!!!!
     
  5. Dec 30, 2004
    mb82

    mb82 I feel great! Sponsor

    Charlottesville Va
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    my problem is i have friends in a machine shop heck i work there but nobody uses machines it is all CNC work. also we are always busier then a one legged man in a kicking contest ( no offence to anyone)
     
  6. Dec 30, 2004
    Old Bill

    Old Bill Aggressively passive....

    Really Southern...
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    Jeez...there you go....that's the problem with you kids nowadays...you never had to learn the hard way, it's all computers. I'll even bet you have one them fancy schmancy Jeep thingys so you don't have to walk uphill in the snow both ways on your way to not learn how to use a real milling machine....
    :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

    All seriousness aside, isn't there a single human controlled mill in the entire shop? Doesn't help the busy part, but I bet a few beers will convince the boss to let someone help you after hours....

    In case it matters I'm 35, and my 80 year old grandfather is an "old school" machinist. Guess I learned with what I had available.
     
  7. Dec 30, 2004
    mb82

    mb82 I feel great! Sponsor

    Charlottesville Va
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    hey when i got the job i was hopeing the boss would teach me one of 2 things welding, or machine work. we have 2 bridgeports but all they are for us are glorified drillpresses. i have a buddy who might be able to help me when he gets off of work but the problem is he gets off at 5 in the morning ( night shift worker)
     
  8. Dec 30, 2004
    Mcruff

    Mcruff Earlycj5 Machinist Sponsor

    Albertville, AL
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    CNC's are fun and can make some neat parts but I at 41 still like to do alot of things old school even though I do know how to program and run a cnc mill. My 1942 South bend lathe was missing a few of the change gears when I bought it a year ago. Some I bought, some I just made from scratch. I built my own indexing head to build the gears and then used it to cut some small splines on other parts. I have run several machines that were older than my father and a few older than my grandfather, it is a trade I wish to pass on but most kids including my son are not interested, at least not yet. My 12 year old daughter has made a few parts on my lathe though.

    Jeff figure out what you want to make and then ask me questions, I have made some partr on a Bridgeport that would make most young CNC programmers mouths hit the floor and ask hundreds of how did you questions!!!!:D
     
  9. Dec 31, 2004
    Monkeyman

    Monkeyman Jeeper and Fast Boater

    East Troy WI
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    Jan 8, 2003
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    With the whole "how do I mount my D-rings/clevis'" question, why don't you do like me and just get your hands on some huge eye hooks and drill the hole's through the bumpers and just bolt them up. Then I use min. 10ton clevis' to hook my staps to the eye hooks. Bullet proof as far as I am concened. BARROWED the clevis' from my work, and my pa BARROWED the eye hooks from his. I have done some severe pulls on those and they seem not to be fazed at all. Was barried above my 35"s and had to take my 98 ranger 4x4 and get a 15 foot floored running start to get it out with my 30x3x30,000# tow strap. Took about 3 tries.
     
  10. Dec 31, 2004
    70CJ5

    70CJ5 Member

    Pleasant Hill, Ohio
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    Not to be a pain or anything but I work with these things almost everyday. They are shackles. A clevis is the pin that goes in a shackle. It has to do with an old Army test that tested bolts for shear strength called a clevis test. Anyway on that note if anyone local needs any I have quite a few and I also travel alot an keep some on the truck for those that are not local. Can't say when I can bring them to you but If I'm in the area I'll drop some off, if local come and get them or if I'm passing through I'll bring them. I have from 2 to 8 ton I think and that is the industrial working strength the breaking strength is 5 times that. The strength they give you at the 4x4 shops are the breaking strength. I did have a 35 ton (working) shackle, but who needs 175 ton (breaking) anyway. The biggest I've seen is 750 ton working strength used to hold the anchor on a ship. That thing was 6 feet tall.
     
  11. Jan 1, 2005
    panzer

    panzer Super Mod Staff Member Sponsor

    Columbus, OH
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    This is my set up. It was originaly 2"x 4"x 1/4" tube steel. I cut out the web on
    the back to be welded to the bumper. On the front ones I cut out the web for
    the tow bar. Works great.
     
  12. Jan 1, 2005
    Mcruff

    Mcruff Earlycj5 Machinist Sponsor

    Albertville, AL
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    I work with these everday also, check websters or any nymber of dictionary's , the definition of a clevis is: ( A U-shaped metal piece with holes in each end through which a pin or bolt is run, used as a fastening device)
    The definition of a shackle describes this and several otther things. I use clevis's everyday to lift, flip and rotate objects in the 20-50 ton range.
     
  13. Jan 1, 2005
    Old Bill

    Old Bill Aggressively passive....

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    Hey there!

    OK, so I spent $40 on a pair of Warn shackles and they say 4 3/4T on the casting. Is this the breaking strength, or the working limit? The number the guy behind the counter said was something like 17K lbs, but 4 3/4 ton is 9500lbs. Can you shed any light on this?
     
  14. Jan 1, 2005
    Boyink

    Boyink Super Moderator Staff Member Sponsor

    Ava, MO
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    Oh...the old shackle/clevis argument rears its ugly head. It's been a good couple years since I've seen this one.

    So I went to Websters...and here's what it said:

    The word shackle is linked to the definition of shackle:


    ;)
     
  15. Jan 1, 2005
    Mcruff

    Mcruff Earlycj5 Machinist Sponsor

    Albertville, AL
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    Thad, if these are American made that is the working load.
     
  16. Jan 3, 2005
    53Flattie

    53Flattie Intigator

    Easley, SC
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    Ever get to the upstate of South Carolina (Greenville area)? If so, I'd certainly take you up on that offer!!!!
     
  17. Jan 3, 2005
    70CJ5

    70CJ5 Member

    Pleasant Hill, Ohio
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    Yes I get there a lot. Will be in Columbia in the next few days and I'll throw some on the truck case I get closer. PM me your address and next time I'm in the area I'll drop some off.

    I have a guy that works for me in Seneca, SC. I can send a few w/ him next time I let him go home if I don't get by there soon.
     
  18. Jan 3, 2005
    70CJ5

    70CJ5 Member

    Pleasant Hill, Ohio
    Joined:
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    4 3/4 ton shackles have a working load of 9500 lbs and a breaking strength (tested) 47,500lbs according to my book. I would contact Warn to see if in fact theirs are tested to a 5 to 1 safety.

     

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