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Brake Bleeders

Discussion in 'The Tool Shed' started by mickeykelley, Sep 14, 2018.

  1. Sep 14, 2018
    mickeykelley

    mickeykelley Well-Known Member

    Republic of Texas
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    Oct 10, 2015
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    1,508
    Can anyone recommend a good one man bleeder? The reviews on the 2 styles at HF are not very good IMO. I have a pressure bleeder for my newer cars that have a screw on master cap and it works great. It works by pressurizing the master, then you just go to each wheel. You do have to watch the master level, but that's not too bad. But trying to find one for these older style dual master with the square top has not been fruitful. I've seen the replacement speed bleeder valves you replace the originals one with, but you can see what's coming out. I know I can bench bleed the master and get the wife to pump the pedal but I'm trying to avoid the old way.
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2018
  2. Sep 14, 2018
    Oldriginal86

    Oldriginal86 Member

    Pasadena, Md.
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    Nov 5, 2014
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    446
    If you already have a pressure bleeder, why not make an adapter to use it on the master cylinder in question. At work there was one pressure tank and several home made adapters. They were just a rectangle steel plate with rubber glued on. Drilled and tapped with a quick disconnect fitting. For the lids held on with a spring clip, we used a C-clamp to secure it. I guess an old lid could be modified by brazing in a quick disconnect fitting.
     
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  3. Sep 14, 2018
    PeteL

    PeteL Member Sponsor 2019 Sponsor

    Hills of NH
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    Why???

    All you need is a short length of tubing and an old peanut butter jar.
     
    Focker likes this.
  4. Sep 14, 2018
    Keys5a

    Keys5a Sponsor Sponsor

    Florida Keys
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    2,204
    I've got one of the pump-up pressure bleeders that looks like (is) a small garden sprayer. I have fashioned about 6 different caps for different applications. The one I had for the original Jeep Wagner single MC had a red plastic cap I modified, but it broke. I should have used an original cast metal version.
    These pump style work OK, but like mentioned, you need to keep a close eye on fluid level so you don't push air.
    -Donny
     
  5. Sep 15, 2018
    47v6

    47v6 junk wrecker! Sponsor

    Washington DC.
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  6. Sep 15, 2018
    supertrooper

    supertrooper Member

    moreno valley, ca
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    Speed bleeders are the only way to go
     
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  7. Sep 16, 2018
    Danefraz

    Danefraz Well-Known Member Sponsor 2019 Sponsor

    Chico CA
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    I bought the $5.99 Napa clear tube, capture cup and bleeder adapters. Find the right fit, crack the bleeder, press the pedal and watch...

    Upside for me, no tub on the frame and easy to see everything.

    Worked like a charm.
     
  8. Jul 22, 2019
    davet

    davet Member

    Andover, MN
    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2003
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    This method has worked for me for 25 yrs:
    1) Take each bleeder screw out and put lots of never-seize on the threads.
    2) get a hose that fits right over the bleeder and put it on.
    3) put small zip tie around it to make it fit tight on the bleeder screw.
    3) Fill large pickle jar with about 3” of brake fluid
    4) pull the hose off the bleeder with zip tie still attached and put you r wrench on the screw
    5) put hose back onto the bleeder and the other end into the pickle jar making sure the end is submerged in fluid.
    6) put a light on the floor to shine into the glass jar
    7) loosen the bleeder screw 1/4 turn with hose still attached
    8) kneel next to the drivers door opening and with your hand push the brake pedal to the floor then release
    —You’ll see air bubbles and dirty fluid swoosh into the clean fluid in the jar.
    —I pump about 3 times and check the MC to add fluid if needed.
    —repeat until you see no air bubbles or dirty fluid
    8) go back and tighten the bleeder screw and go to the next wheel
    9) when your done Pour the dirty fluid back into a sealable bottle and use it in the pickle jar next time to save on fluid.
    10) I keep the jar, a bottle of dirty fluid and a bottle of clean fluid in a box with the hose.
    This hose and zip tie have lasted me 25 yrs.
    The never seize on the bleeder screw keeps air from getting by the threads.
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2019
    Danefraz likes this.
  9. Jul 22, 2019
    PeteL

    PeteL Member Sponsor 2019 Sponsor

    Hills of NH
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    No no no... a pickle jar is all wrong. It needs to be a peanut-butter jar.

    I use a clear tube on the bleeder, no zip tie. Good tip on the NeverSeize
     
    Danefraz likes this.
  10. Jul 22, 2019
    Bowbender

    Bowbender I'm workin' on it! Sponsor

    Northern Minn.
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    I think the pickle jar is more traditional, they're still glass. My peanut butter jars are plastic. :p
     
  11. Jul 22, 2019
    rusty

    rusty Well-Known Member

    norfolk,va
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    Yep, speed bleeders.
     
  12. Jul 22, 2019
    davet

    davet Member

    Andover, MN
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    My CJ has peanut allergies hence the pickle jar
     
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  13. Jul 23, 2019
    Dave Deyton

    Dave Deyton Member

    Fuquay-Varina, NC
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    Oct 12, 2003
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    I have used the pickle jar with clear tubing for years. My son's TJ gave me problems bleeding the brakes.
    The anti-seize on the threads might just be the fix.

    I will have to try the speed bleeders.


    Good advice.

    Dave
     
  14. Jul 23, 2019
    davet

    davet Member

    Andover, MN
    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2003
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    162
    I also cut a piece of hose about an inch long and plug one end with Permatex.
    Let the Permatex dry then slide that over the bleeder when you’re done bleeding. Keeps dirt out of bleeder and keeps area around the threads clean. Keeps the never-seize from getting washed off during washing.
    They stay on during street use and off road.
    I first tried capping the hose with short bolts but they seemed too heavy and the hose would come off the bleeder.
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2019
  15. Jul 23, 2019
    Dave Deyton

    Dave Deyton Member

    Fuquay-Varina, NC
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2003
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    These are some great ideas. Not only for this bleeding job but for future brake jobs.

    Thanks,


    Dave
     
  16. Jul 23, 2019
    davet

    davet Member

    Andover, MN
    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2003
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    162
    One other thing when working on brake lines whether new or just taking an old one apart for some reason:
    —put never-seize on the threads of course.
    —Also, slide the threaded nut portion back an inch or so and coat the end of the line up to the flare with never-seize.
    Now the threaded portion won’t adhere to the line.
    Sometimes you can get the threads to loosen but if the threaded portion is stuck to the line the line will just twist.
     
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